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Swimming Fit Friday Natation Forme Vendredi

This weeks’ Swimming Fit Friday – Goal Setting

This weeks’ Swimming Fit Friday we are going to talk Goal Setting and getting started.

Well into our second month of 2018, congratulations you made it! For those us of who were quick to make up new years resolutions, maybe some of us have fallen off the horse. On the other hand some of us may be late to making major changes. If this is you, there’s no time like the present. A good friend of mine said it’s good to start things on a Monday, keeping that in mind we’ll spark a fire to get active on a Fit Friday, prep over the weekend and hit the ground running on Motivation Monday!

SMART, that’s the acronym those of us working to be successful follow. Take the time to read these questions provided by the SMART acronym when that light bulb goes off.

Swimming Fit Friday

Swimming Fit Friday:
Alex and Eamon going over SMART goals with their swimmers.

SMART stands for:

  • Specific: What do you want to achieve?
  • Measurable: Is this goal something you can measure?
  • Attainable: Can you accomplish this goal?
  • Relevant: Does this goal add value?
  • Time: What is the time frame we are going to do this in, and is it reasonable?

It is through this method we filter our ideas and get specific, and start to make real progress. Take this tool and share your SMART goal with someone you care about, hold yourself accountable to your goals. Through sharing we are now accountable to ourselves and those we shared it with.

 

 

Swimming Fit Friday

Swimming Fit Friday: Swimmer practicing Front Crawl.

Let’s look at an example:

S – Swim Freestyle 100m in under 2:00m

M – Yes, because we can use a timer to verify success

A – Yes, because I know how to perform basic Freestyle

R – I am training for ASAC

T – The ASAC meet is in 4 months

Understanding that this is where we want to be in 4 months time, we can add milestones throughout our journey. This can be checked at the end of each practice, or at the end of each month. Having Milestones in addition to our SMART allow us to re-evaluate our plans to attain this goal.

We’ll that’s all for this weeks Swimming Fit Friday. All the best!

Swimming Tip Tuesday

Swimming Tip Tuesday Front Crawl Speed and Power

This weeks Swimming Tip Tuesday will dive a little deeper into building our power as we do Front Crawl which will ultimately assist with our overall speed of the stroke. Despite swimming being a full body exercise, an area often neglected by swimmers is developing upper body strength. Fortunately for most swimmers, when sharpening our technique we can also enhance our upper body strength, with that said, let’s dive in.

Swimming Fit FridayWhat we want to remember: that the swimmer should not start pulling their arm back until they give themselves enough room to reach forward under the water. Here’s why, extending the arm as far forward as the swimmer can allows for a longer opportunity to generate power. The longer pull builds musculature within the biceps and triceps.

When performing Front Crawl the step before recovery (when the arm exits the water) is to pull the hand past the hip to propel the body forward. If the distance between reaching forward and pulling back is shorter, the swimmer will generate less power.

Less power generated from the arms will force the swimmer to rely heavily on strength from their legs. This is only optimal if the swimmer is performing a Front Glide. Movement of the arms out of the water brings the body out of a streamline position. When the arms are misused, or used incorrectly this slows the swimmer down. The purpose of utilizing the arms during a stroke like Front Crawl is meant to assist rather than burden the lower body. It creates a more effective opportunity to generate power, and propulsion as well as opportunities for breathing.Swimming Tip Tuesday

As a swimmer becomes more advance the addition of ‘S’ pull will allow the swimmer to generate much more power. As the swimmer is performing Front Crawl, there will be a longer and longer moment of forward movement in between each pull phase, due to the propulsion.

To Summarize, reach for the stars, or this case as far forward as you can before each and every pull!

Swimming Tip Tuesday

Swimming Tip Tuesday: Don’t Start pulling your arm back until you give yourself room to reach forward under the water.

Swimming Fit Friday Natation Forme Vendredi

Swimming Fit Friday Balance and Core Strength

This weeks’ Swimming Fit Friday, is going to look over balance and core strength. In the world of fitness there is specific terms also called “jargon” used to identify various movements, and target areas. One of those terms is core. Seemingly straight forward, your core refers to the centre portion of your body. The muscles that compose ones core in the front are as follows:

  • Rectus adbominis
  • Internal Obliques
  • External Obliques
  • Transverse abdominis

The back core muscles include, the multifidus and erector spinae group.

In simpler terms, the abdominals, obliques, and erector spinae groups are the main muscle groups within ones core. These muscles are key components of what allow us to have proper balance when performing various tasks within our day-to-day life. If our core strength is weak, our balance will be shake and that makes one prone to falls.

As we age, strengthening and maintaining ones core muscles is essential, because most hip related injuries occur during falls. It is also important to understand that having hip injuries that lead to hip replacements significantly reduce our life expectancy, and overall quality of life.

Another factor that comes with age is that it becomes increasingly more difficult to bare excess weight. Excess weight creates an additional strain on our joints. To combat this aquatic workouts are the most effective! As a result of the reduced impact on the joints, furthermore due to the buoyancy of the water we can challenge different muscle groups more effectively.

The following are examples of exercises one can do to help strengthen and maintain their core strength & balance:

  • Leg sweeps: For this move you will keep one foot on the ground. With the other leg you will abduct or move away from the center of the body in a sweeping motion. Once your leg is pushed as far as you feel comfortable, bend at the knee and adduct or move the leg back towards the center of your body. Do this move on both sides, as it challenges balance and core strength, as well as provides a great leg workout!
  • Swimming Fit Friday Natation Forme VendrediTree pose: Often done in yoga, can also be performed in the water. The swimmer will have one foot remains on the ground. With the other, the swimmer will place their foot on the inner calf, not the knee or ankle(as that will put unnecessary pressure on the joint). As this is done, one can raise the hands up towards the ceiling inhaling and as the arms relax back down exhale. This can be done as many times as the swimmer wants, make sure to work both sides, with this great core and balance exercise!
  • Crunches: Using a pool noodle, the swimmer will lean back and suspend them selves in the water on the noodle. Thus the swimmers feet should be off the ground. Once steady the swimmer will pull their knees in towards the chest and then push away repetitively for about 60 seconds. This can be done in between other exercises.
  • L-sit or V-sit: Using the noodle the swimmer will lean back and suspend them selves in the water on the noodle. Bending at the hips/waist the swimmer will hold their feet up so that their toes are either at the top of the water or are exiting the water with straight legs. To make either an L or a V shape. Hold for about 30-60 seconds at a time.Swimming Fit Friday Natation Forme Vendredi

Now you have some examples of exercises you can take the pool with you one your next swim. Well that’s a wrap for this weeks swimming Fit Friday, until next time!

Swimming Tip Tuesday

Swimming Tip Tuesday: Butterfly Arms

 

Today’s Swimming Tip Tuesday is an Advanced Tip! As we progress throughout swimming, we challenge ourselves to learn more complicated strokes, and more competitive and competition oriented strokes. If this is where your interest lies, look more into Aqua Fun Academy’s ASAC program. The Link is provided below:

http://aquafunacademy.ca/asac/

Butterfly is one of the most co-ordination heavy strokes, similar to Breaststroke. However Butterfly also requires well-conditioned upper body strength, and flexible shoulder mobility. This stroke can be learned in steps, for today’s Swimming Tip Tuesday we will focus on the arm movements associated with the Butterfly.

When beginning the Butterfly, the arms should move forward in a circular motion forward. Rotating at the shoulder and reaching the hand in front of the body as far as possible, and then pushing the arms down along the sides of the body. This is done to condition and build flexibility within the shoulders. When the stroke is performed both arms will move in unison, however to practice the sweeping motion, swimmers can use a flutter board and practice one arm at a time.

To begin generating more explosive power through the stroke, the swimmer will adjust the movement of the hands through the water. With the palms facing down the swimmer will draw one half of a keyhole through the water, swiftly pulling the arm up and out of the water. Similarly to the first movement this can also be practiced one arm at a time with the use of a flutter board. Once the swimmer is comfortable begin to practice the move in unison, remembering to breathe once the arms exit the water and enter the recovery phase.

Now that we’ve analyzed circular motion, and how to generate power, we can move into the recovery phase of Butterfly. The recovery phase of a stroke is usually when the arms exit the water. As the arms come up out of the water, we want the backs of the hands to face each other, extending the arms forward and keeping them should width apart. At this point in the stroke, we want to take advantage of our time out of the water, and take a deep breathe in. To see Butterfly in motion by none other than Michael Phelphs himself, refer to the link below: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jd67PMryIT0

Tip Summary:

The arms extend forward and kept shoulder width apart. The palms should face downwards. Swimming Tip Tuesday

 

 

Swimming Tip Tuesday

Swimming Tip Tuesday Common beginner mistakes for Front Crawl

Today’s swimming Tip Tuesday will focus on a common beginner mistake for Front Crawl, regarding ones head position.

When doing Front Crawl the swimmers head position is important because it is one of the key points of rotation when breathing. If the swimmers head is miss-positioned the head can act like an anchor and cause the body to sink. The act of sinking causes the swimmer to exert unnecessary energy to complete the stroke for any desired distance.

A common beginner mistake is the swimmer will pull their head up, or forward facing when going to take a breath, rather than turn to the side. This creates unwanted strain on the neck, and throws the body out of a streamlined alignment.

To avoid this, read the following listed below:

  • The swimmer should breathe rhythmically, exhaling for a fixed period (3 seconds) of time and inhaling for a fixed period (three seconds) of time
  • The swimmer should focus on the location of the ear and nose while turning the head to the side
  • The swimmer should turn their head with the movement of their arm as they go into a side glide

Side glide: The swimmer extends one arm past the head leaning the ear down into the water bringing the swimmer onto their side. Keeping the other arm resting slightly behind the hip.

Another common beginner mistake is the swimmer will look forward, towards the wall ahead of them while blowing bubbles. Again putting unnecessary strain on the neck and throwing the body out of alignment.

While the swimmer is blowing bubbles into the water via the mouth or nose, the swimmer should aim to keep their head in the water with their eyes looking down. The swimmers head should be in line with the body and the water level should come between the eyebrows and hairline.

Indications of proper head position are as follows:

  • The swimmers neck is relaxed and not strained upwards
  • The swimmers ears are under water completely
  • The swimmers eyes are facing the floor beneath them
  • The swimmers chin is slightly tucked towards the chest

If all of the above are performed, the swimmer has successfully executed the proper head position for Front Crawl.

Tip: With eyes looking forward and down, your head should be in line with the body and the water level should come between your eyebrows and hairline.

Well That’s all for this weeks Swimming Tip Tuesday!

Until Next Time!Swimming Tip Tuesday

Swimming Tip Tuesday

Swimming Tip Tuesday: Butterfly – Dolphin Kick

Today’s Swimming Tip Tuesday Butterfly – Dolphin Kick

Butterfly is a more advance stroke, for it requires controlled upper body strength and coordination of the arms and legs. Because of how advance this skill is we will revisit and discuss other components in future article, so keep your eyes pealed for some helpful pro tips.

Swimming is all about transferable skills, for those who have master Breaststroke an intermediate skill in which there is a large amount of coordination involved between the upper and lower body. The coordination of arms and legs during Butterfly will come more naturally in comparison to those who are still grasping Breaststroke. Another transferable skill is mastery of dolphin kick, as it is a direct building block for the overall mastery of Dolphin Kick.

In today’s Swimming Tip Tuesday we will focus on the how to execute the dolphin kick component of Butterfly.

When executing dolphin kick a large part of the movement comes from isolation of the hips. In a streamlined position along the water, the swimmer will push their pelvis downward to generate momentum that will move down the body from the hips, thighs, knees, calves, and then feet.

This downward push of the pelvis is done twice. The first wave to allows for mostly forward momentum, the second wave is used to generate upward momentum to bring the torso and head out of the water. Allowing the swimmer to breathe.

Pro tips:

  • Swimmers often use the imagery of a mermaid tail to describe how the legs push through the water, while keeping them close together.
  • The catch in between kicks is important, you want to pull the hips up higher on the second kick to help generate more downward momentum.
  • While doing the kick the first kick will always be smaller then the second. The size of the kicks refers to the amount of downward movement from the hips.
  • Powerful downbeats of the feet then propel the body forward. Try to keep your legs close together with your ankles relaxed.Swimming Tip Tuesday
Swimming Tip Tuesday

Swimming Tip Tuesday: Kicking

Today’s Swimming Tip Tuesday is on kicking:

Kicking is a key aspect of swimming, specifically flutter kick. It is used in both Front crawl also known as freestyle to those who swim competitively.  As well as during Back crawl, which is still called Back crawl even if the stroke is done competitively. Due to the fact that the muscles in our legs are significantly stronger than the muscles in our arms, it is essentially to learn how to use these muscles effectively. As one learns more strokes and swimming techniques, how and what we do with our legs to propel our bodies in the forward motion, or sometimes in an upward motion varies. To increase propulsion it is important to have mastery of kicking, especially flutter kick.

Swimming Tip Tuesday: an example of fluter kick

Swimming Tip Tuesday: an example of fluter kick

When doing flutter kick, we must remember to keep our toes pointed, as show in the photo to the left. As well as to generate power from our hips. Simply put we must kick from our hips rather than our knees. This is done by keeping the entirety of the leg mainly straight. With minimal bending at the knees. When we accomplish this we allow our legs to stay fairly close together. This is important! Though as a new swimmer it is common to push our legs up or down splitting our legs a great distance apart, usually in a effort to increase propulsion. In practice pushing our legs far away from each other increases drag, which slows us down. Ultimately leading to increased fatigue which in turn forces us to complete a shorter distances.

To achieve greater distances without out getting very tired in practice it is more beneficial to keep our leg movements small and rhythmic. This will allow us to increase our forward propulsion. Think of it as having your legs tip-toe near the top of the water. The steadier this motion, the better we stay streamlined. Due to our optimal body positioning the water will assist your streamline position and thus move you forward at a faster rate.

All in all you want to remember to Kick with your legs close together!

Swimming Tip Tuesday

Your legs should be close together

 

Swimming Tip Tuesday

Swimming Tip Tuesday: Back Crawl, relax the neck.

This weeks Swimming Tip Tuesday will focus on Back Crawl and relaxation of the neck. A Common beginner mistake while doing Back Crawl is to tilt the head upwards, as if they are looking at their chest or their toes. This creates unnecessary strain on the neck and can lead soreness along the neck. Another disadvantage to this tilted position of the head and neck is, that it partially closes the airway. Thus inhibiting the free flow of the breathe in and out of the body. This tension adds more stress on the body, ultimately compromising our streamlined position.Swimming Tip Tuesday

When performing Back Crawl, the swimmer wants to relax their head back so that their ears are partially or fully submerged in the water. If either the swimmer or instructor notices that there is still a feeling of tension within the neck, or that the body position looks awkward. There is another way to set the body into streamlined position.

The swimmer while on their back, must focus on where their chin points:

  • If the swimmers chin is pointed towards the chest that indicates that the swimmer is looking at their chest/toes.
  • If the swimmer’s chin is pointed upwards towards the ceiling, this means that the swimmer is overcompensating and looking towards the wall behind them.

The swimmer wants the chin to be held within these two points (as mentioned above) so that the swimmer is looking directly at the ceiling above them while performing Back Crawl. Maintaining this position will remove all tension, and keep the swimmer in a streamlined position.

Once the swimmer as achieved the ideal body positioning for the head and neck, the swimmer will also increase their speed for their will be less drag acting on the body.

Expert Tip: In short your head should be still and your neck relaxed. Holding your head up too high will cause strain to the neck and slow you down in the water.

Until Next Swimming Tip Tuesday!

Swimming Tip Tuesday

Swimming Tip Tuesday

Swimming Tip Tuesday: Breathing FC

Today’s Swimming Tip Tuesday we will look at Front Crawl, specifically breathing and how to correct common mistakes.

Front Crawl, as we progress through the levels, becomes more and more about positioning and coordination. Timing is just one small element of getting this stroke in motion; especially in regards to breathing throughout a stroke.

Through my own teaching experience I have seen a multitude of interesting ways to breathe incorrectly. It is common for swimmers at all stages to develop habits that do not aid us in perfecting the stroke.

In order to retrieve a full breathe while doing Front Crawl, the swimmer must keep various things in mind.

  • When pulling the arms around to whether we are doing big circles or Front Crawl with bent arm, we want to be in the beginnings of side glide position as we take the breath. A common mistake occurs when we breathe as we are exiting the recovery phase. Simply put, breathe as you bring the arm out of the water, and not while you are putting your arm back into the water.
  • Head positioning is crucial, we want to keep about half our face within the water. Angling our chin towards the ceiling to bring in more air. As ones stroke increases in speed, you will want to stretch your mouth to the top side to keep it clear above the water.
  • Another way to bring our face to the correct position when first beginning to learn Front Crawl, is to bring our ear down shoulder during the side glide phase of the stroke.

Another thing to keep in mind, while performing Front Crawl is that breathing during swimming shares the same principles as breathing during other physical activities we exhale on the effort (in the water), and inhale during the recovery (while we bring our arms out).

Until Next Weeks Swimming Tip Tuesday!Swimming Tip Tuesday

Swimming Tip Tuesday

Swimming Tip Tuesday – Streamline Breastroke

Todays’ Swimming Tip Tuesday we will talk about staying streamline while doing Breaststroke.

In previous Swimming Tip Tuesdays’ we have isolated various movements that help simplify this complicated stroke that is Breaststroke. We’ve also discussed maintaining streamline body position during other strokes. Today we are going to look at the body from the top of the torso to the knees when performing Breaststroke.

In Breast Stroke the body moves through a sequence of steps: pull, breathe, whip, and glide for three seconds. During the glide phase the body is in perfect streamline position, as seen in the photo below.

Swimming Tip Tuesday

Swimming Tip Tuesday: An example of a swimmer in full glide potion.

When a swimmer executes the pull and breathe phase we partially break streamline position. However these motions are to help us generate forward momentum. As we whip, the arms are returning to streamline position. In order to prevent drag as we whip the swimmer must try to keep their thighs at the same level as their torso.

There are a few ways to create drag during the whip phase that many beginners do while learning the stroke.

  • The swimmer drops their knees towards the ground as the initiate the bend phase.
  • The swimmer bends at the hips while they initiate the bend phase.
  • The swimmer bends so their ankles exit the water.

Now that we understand the mistakes that can be made how do we correct these?

  • The Swimmer aims their knees towards the wall directly behind us, keeping our thighs inline with our torso.
  • The swimmer bends their heels back towards our buttocks without bending at the hips.
  • During the whip phase the swimmer keeps their ankles under the water.

If the swimmer accomplishes all three of these corrections, they will improve speed efficiency and technique during Breaststroke, as a result of creating less drag.

Well that’s a wrap for this Swimming Tip Tuesday, until next time!Swimming Tip Tuesday