Aqua Fun Academy
Swimming Tip Tuesday

Swimming Tip Tuesday – Diving and lift off

Todays’ Swimming Tip Tuesday, we are going to discuss diving and the importance of using our legs!

When diving it is important to bend at the knees to provide proper lift off.

A common mistake amongst new divers happens when we forget to use our legs correctly, especially during a standing dive. Trying to generate force without bending at the knees creates the opportunity to enter the water chest first instead of hands first. What those of us familiar with diving blunders call a “belly flop”. To avoid this painful lesson, here are some tips about how to position ourselves to enter the water hands first.

From the start push your feet down into the ground preparing to jump, pointing where you want to enter the water with your hands. Remember to keep your hands together, throughout the glide phase of your dive.

  • Place feet side by side

If this is uncomfortable, one may spread their feet no wider than shoulder width apart. This marks our take off point, make sure ones’ toes are as close to the edge of the pool as possible.

  • Bend at the knees till about mid-squat position

This position allows the swimmer to prepare for proper execution of the dive. Furthermore, holding this position we will want to push off with our toes pointed towards our take off point.

  • Bend at the hips bringing the upper body close to the legs.

By lowering the body, we give ourselves a closer point of entrance into the water. We also allow the swimmer to achieve the arch necessary for entering the water hands first.

Remember when moving from the take off point, we want to aim our body out. As to travel forwards, as well as upwards. The image we want to form in our mind is an half moon.

Best of Luck, and Happy Diving!Swimming Tip Tuesday

Swimming Fit Friday Natation Forme Vendredi

Swimming Fit Friday: Water Yoga

Today’s Swimming Fit Friday is all about Water Yoga

Why Water Yoga? Well as the old saying goes, if you don’t use it, you lose it. Exercising in the water as a stand alone has a multitude of benefits for the body.

  • Reduced stress impact on joints
  • Increased blood flow due to hydro-static properties
  • Water resistance assist in balanced muscle development
  • Water buoyancy assist in maintaining as well as increasing range of motion

These are just a few of the benefits that come with working in water, when coupled with Yoga we introduce a broader list of benefits, that also incorporates a positive effect on the individuals’ mental health.

  • Reduces mental tension
  • Improves cognitive functions
  • Regulation of sleep schedule
Swimming Fit Friday

Tree Pose

Please refer to the link below for the article on Oneness and Buoyancy:

http://aquafunacademy.ca/swimming-fit-friday-oneness-buoyancy/

When combining water and yoga together, we can enhance the following benefits:

  • Postural strength
  • Muscular endurance
  • Weight distribution*

When thinking of our weight, often it is simplified to how much one weighs. Contrary to this method of thinking, the distribution of weight can be broken down into and various elements. Visceral fat (around the organs) or subcutaneous fat (underneath the skin), musculature, and water weight; all of these are important. Through the movements of Yoga combined with water and performed correctly, can improve overall weight distribution.

Focusing on the overall number of our cumulative weight distracts us from achieving our fitness goals. Through Water Yoga, we can,

  • Boosts Metabolism
  • Promote and maintain muscle growth
  • Better balance and coordination
  • maintain and increase flexibility
  • Promote brain elasticity by engaging in new movements*

Working in water forces us to adjust the way we move in it. In order to properly isolate muscle groups, and safely utilize the resistance of water. Learning these new techniques and movements strengthens the motor centers in the brain, promoting brain elasticity.

aquafit-slider-2Well that just about wraps up  today’s Swimming Fit Friday. Why Water Yoga -not convinced? Seeing is believing, but why not try a class?

Check out Aqua Fun Academy’s Health and Fitness section in the link below:

http://aquafunacademy.ca/health-fitness/

Swimming Tip Tuesday

Swimming Tip Tuesday: Back Crawl

In Today’s Swimming Tip Tuesday: A breath is taken every time an arm completes a full cycle. Try breathing in as one arm passes your ear and exhale as the other arm passes.

Breathing, something we do every single day of our lives. Breathing in passion, and breathing out results! Breathing, as it is something we do involuntarily should be easy enough to do in the water! Integrating our movements to sync up with our breathing requires a little more thought than expected. Though while swimming on our back a swimmer has the added advantage that their face is out of the water for the duration of the stroke. So, when do we breathe? In any exercise, we want to exhale on the effort and inhale during the recovery phase.

In back crawl the effort is when the arm is re-entering the water, during the push phase. While the recovery phase is when the water enters the air, or exits the water, both of these elements are what compose a complete cycle of back crawl arms. Understanding the basic mechanics of the stroke it should be easy to break down when to breathe.

However, when back crawl is done both arms move juxtaposed. Meaning one arm is always in the opposite phase to the other. To get around this conundrum, the swimmer can focus on one arms cycle and co-ordinate their breathing in time with that arm. Our dominant arm can vary from sport to sport, so an easy way to find out which of the two is a swimmers’ dominant arm, is to take note of which arm the swimmer start their stroke with. When the swimmers dominant arm is out of the water they must remember to inhale, similarly when the swimmers dominant arm is in the water, they must remember to exhale.Swimming Tip Tuesday

Throwback Thursday

Swimming Throwback Thursday: Water Volleyball

Swimming Throwback Thursday: Water Volleyball

Throwback Thursday to summer camp water activities with Head Counsellors Sayon and Hannah. After spending the mornings playing sports outside and breaking a sweat in the gym, what better way to cool off the afternoon in than in our swimming pool! Our afternoon consists of one hour of swimming lessons, followed by an hour of free play in the pool. By request, counsellors can set up in-water games like water volleyball (pictured in photo), water polo, capture the flag, etc… But most of the time, kids just want to do cannonballs!

Summer starts in two weeks! Don’t have a camp for your kids yet? Join us for a week full of outdoor and indoor sports, arts and crafts, and daily swimming! Learn more here: http://ow.ly/DITp30c1kvr

????

July 26, 2016

 

About Water Volleyball:

Water volleyball is a team sport derived from volleyball in which the games are played in water. The sport is played in the United States, Europe and South America.

Water volleyball is mostly played in swimming pools. The court used varies from 3 X 2m to 6 X 5m in dimensions. A net that runs across the width of the court divides it into two equal halves. Different types of balls are used for playing, but the most suitable is a beach ball which is at least 28cm in diameter.

The sport is played at both recreational and competitive level. For recreational play, a team can have for 1 to 4 players, but in competitions each team should have four players.

Similar to that of volleyball, each play starts with a serve, followed by back and forth returns, until one team scores a point. However, the game play and scoring system works similar to that of table-tennis, where each team alternately gets to serve twice regardless of who scores the point, and the team to first reach 11 is the winner of the set.

There are some variations in, court size, the number of players per team, and the total number of sets played in a match, depending on which country the game is being played at.

Swimming Fit Friday Natation Forme Vendredi

Swimming Fit Friday – The Importance of Stretching

Today’s Swimming Fit Friday Post we will discuss the importance of stretching.

Many of us are guilty of neglecting stretching as a part of our regular routine. Though as we age it becomes increasingly important to stretch in our daily lives. Stretching dependent on the duration and intensity can be it’s own separate work out. For example Yoga is highly focused on learning ones body but also on stretching ones body and increasing the general range of motion. Our range of motion is composed of two elements; how well we can rotate and twist around a joint, secondly, how easily are these movements accomplished. The more frequently we stretch our range of motion increases. In the water it is relatively easier to work on expanding our ROM (range of motion).

I’m going to give some pointers on a helpful stretch one can do over time to help alleviate stiffness and reduce pain, which one can do in the water, as well as on land. Though the effectiveness of these movements is greater within the water.

A stretch for those of us with tight hips, or pain radiating down the outer most portion of the thigh the following stretch can help.

The equipment needed for this stretch is a pool noodle. Though it can be done without if one has a very strong scull.Swimming Fit Friday

  • Bringing the noodle underneath ones arms and keeping good posture
  • Place your right foot over top of your left knee.
  • Just above the ankle as well as to the left of your knee apply pressure and ease yourself into a seated position.

This stretch will open up the hips. If one has good balance within the water, try to pick your foot closest to the ground off of the floor – putting the body into suspend. This will further allow you to open up your hips and stretch the IT band down the side of the leg. Hold for up to 15-30 seconds at a time, on each side. If one is doing this as a beginner on land do so while sitting on the edge of a chair to Swimming Fit Fridaymaintain proper form.Swimming Fit Friday

Swimming Tip Tuesday

Swimming Tip Tuesday Minimizing Energy

This weeks Swimming Tip Tuesday we will discuss minimizing our energy output during swimming.

Whether you are swimming competitively, for leisure, being in the water requires a bit more energy, simply due to the increased resistance one has to work in. It is also a well understood among veteran swimmers that, swimming is about efficiency and energy conservation. In simple words, swimming is about getting the most bang for you buck. The sport of swimming is to craft each movement to generate optimal levels of power and propulsion for the least amount of out put, allowing us to fatigue at a much slower rate in comparison to many other sports.

For those of us, progressing through the life saving program, mastery of our strokes helps us to minimize our energy expenditure. Here are some examples of how to do that for various life saving skills.

The 15meter underwater swim

Swimming Tip Tuesday

Swimming Tip Tuesday: An example of a swimmer in full glide potion.

Pro tips:

  • Utilize the wall; in doing this, one should become spring like bending at the knees and pushing hard off the wall until ones legs are straight. Furthermore we want to keep our hands forward in front of us as if we were doing a superman/ front glide. The longer we can keep our body streamlined the less drag we experience the faster and further we move through the water allows us to minimize the stress of holding our breathe.
  • Breathing techniques; for some the stress on the cardiovascular system while holding our breathe can hinder us. A useful trick, to increase the length of our breath, is to blow our bubbles out of the nose. This can be accomplished by humming – forcing the air out of our nose at a much slower rate.

Any Timed Swim

Pro tips:

  • 1 – Tip one also applies here (please see above). To elaborate on how this helps us during a time swim, we save energy and allow the initial force to most of the work for us.
  • 1a- Flip turns, allow us to utilize the wall explained in tip one (please see above).
    Swimming Tip Tuesday

    Swimming Tip Tuesday: an example of flutter kick.

  • Emphasis on how we kick is important. The further apart our legs separate as we flutter kick, the more drag we create, which ultimately slow us down. Keep your kicks small and steady. By doing this we minimize how much energy we waste in recovery between kicks and instead perform more like a continuous motor boat.

Overall minimize how much energy you’re using by holding your glide as long as you can. As well as being a more efficient technique, this is a good way to establish some rhythm and control in your swimming.

Swimming Tip Tuesday

MotivationMonday

Swimming Motivation Monday: Failure

Today’s Swimming Motivation Monday:

Don’t worry about failure, you only have to be right once. – Drew Houston.

It is a well known fact that as an inventor, Thomas Edison made 1,000 unsuccessful attempts at inventing the light bulb. When a reporter asked, “How did it feel to fail 1,000 times?” Edison replied, “I didn’t fail 1,000 times. The light bulb was an invention with 1,000 steps.” Before undertaking any new adventure or endeavour, it is vital to check your mindset. Especially if it’s your first time trying something, the likelihood of failure is very high, and you need to be prepared to deal with it. You must have the guts to experiment, you must have the courage to try hundreds of different things and you must be prepared to fail. You must be prepared to learn through failure and put your ego aside. You have to admit to yourself that you’re wrong, that you don’t know anything. At least in the beginning.

It’s easy to call failure after the first setback. But preparing for the unexpected is isn’t just sound judgement, it’s solid life planning. It’s impossible to get everything right every time. The best way to cope with failure is adjusting your mindset. You can either call it a failure, or you can call it learning a lesson. If you choose to think of failure as a teacher, then you can approach the problem again, with updated information and a revised plan that accounts for your circumstances of failure in the original scenario. There’s an old saying, first attributed to German General Helmuth von Moltke, and now used the world over in all walks of life: “No battle plan survives contact with the enemy.” When plans meet the real world, it’s not the real world that will yield to your plan; you much adapt whatever you’re doing to the circumstances truly at hand. Being caught up in your plans is like being caught up in your vehicle’s dashboard instruments. They provide local information, but they do so without context.

There is nothing out there you can’t accomplish. However, the problem with a negative thought is not just contained within that moment. One singular negative thought can often serve as a catalyst for a chain of negativity. That negativity, if gone unchecked, will lead to pessimism, and ultimately defeatism and hopelessness. The resulting cycle leads to perpetual cynicism, and an aversion to new thought, new ideas, new experiences. A helpful tip is to look for the silver lining in every situation. If you’re thinking negatively because of the fear of failure, remember you only have to be right once. No matter how dim it seems, there is always a way through. Life never throws you more than you can handle.

Remember, the master has failed more times than the beginner has even tried.

??Lire en Français: http://ow.ly/Rkb130cliyv

????⛵

Don't Worry About Failure

MotivationMonday

Swimming Motivation Monday: Plan A

Today’s Swimming Motivation Monday:

If “Plan A” doesn’t work, the alphabet has 25 more letters. – Claire Cook.

It’s easy to call failure after the first setback. But preparing for the unexpected is isn’t just sound judgement, it’s solid life planning. It’s impossible to get everything right every time. The best way to cope with failure is adjusting your mindset. You can either call it a failure, or you can call it learning a lesson. If you choose to think of failure as a teacher, then you can approach the problem again, with updated information and a revised plan that accounts for your circumstances of failure in the original scenario. There’s an old saying, first attributed to German General Helmuth von Moltke, and now used the world over in all walks of life: “No battle plan survives contact with the enemy.” When plans meet the real world, it’s not the real world that will yield to your plan; you much adapt whatever you’re doing to the circumstances truly at hand. Being caught up in your plans is like being caught up in your vehicle’s dashboard instruments. They provide local information, but they do so without context.

There is nothing out there you can’t accomplish. However, the problem with a negative thought is not just contained within that moment. One singular negative thought can often serve as a catalyst for a chain of negativity. That negativity, if gone unchecked, will lead to pessimism, and ultimately defeatism and hopelessness. The resulting cycle leads to perpetual cynicism, and an aversion to new thought, new ideas, new experiences. A helpful tip is to look for the silver lining in every situation. If you’re thinking negatively because of the fear of failure, remember you only have to be right once. No matter how dim it seems, there is always a way through. Life never throws you more than you can handle.

Be ready for anything.

??Lire en Français: http://ow.ly/jnHa30c8je0

????⛵

If “Plan A” doesn’t work

MotivationMonday

Swimming Motivation Monday: Quality

Today’s Swimming Motivation Monday:

Quality means doing it right when no one is looking, – Henry Ford.

It’s been proven that people behave differently when they know they’re being watched. Suddenly there’s a need to display the best version of yourself, whether it’s to avoid criticism, to fit in, or to show off. In today’s super competitive business world it is easy to lose sight at the importance of taking pride in what you do and what you produce. But successful people always perform as if they are being watched. Even when no one is watching, they are watching themselves and hold themselves to that standard. The higher standard forms the foundation of their success, it is a reflection of their peak performance levels. The result is high quality in work, which can also positively affect those around them.

There is nothing out there you can’t accomplish. However, the problem with a negative thought is not just contained within that moment. One singular negative thought can often serve as a catalyst for a chain of negativity. That negativity, if gone unchecked, will lead to pessimism, and ultimately defeatism and hopelessness. The resulting cycle leads to perpetual cynicism, and an aversion to new thought, new ideas, new experiences. A helpful tip is to look for the silver lining in every situation. If you’re thinking negatively because of the fear of failure, remember you only have to be right once. No matter how dim it seems, there is always a way through. Life never throws you more than you can handle.

Someone with determination and an aspiration to do something in life will focus on their tasks, accomplishments and goals, instead of focusing on competition around them. Many a times, people get driven by competition around them. If you are more keen on getting ahead of others, you will never be focused on your goals because you attention is diverted elsewhere. People who are genuinely interested in achieving their goals for their self-satisfaction are those who have real talent and are keen on enhancing their skills and capabilities. This group of people will go far in life. Being the best is a byproduct of your drive to achieve.

??Lire en Français: http://ow.ly/Okwi30bxYD7

????⛵

Quality means doing it right when no one is watching

Throwback Thursday

Swimming Throwback Thursday: Ring Bobbing

Swimming Throwback Thursday: Ring Bobbing

Throwback Thursday to ring bobbing with Alex, Mark and Mira. Ring bobbing is an activity used throughout the preschool levels, up until Swim Kids 1 and 2 to encourage younger children to submerge their heads underwater, and later on to open their eyes underwater. The rings presents children with an underwater target, providing both a distraction and a measure of success. For added challenge, the instructor might add a distance element to the underwater swim.

You can exhale through your mouth or through your nose or through both, it doesn’t matter. But when your face is in the water you should be exhaling all the time in one constant stream of bubbles. After inhaling and returning their face to the water, most people hold that breath for at least one stroke, if not two. Shortly before their next inhalation they exhale very late into the water, often finishing that exhalation into the air when they’ve turned to breathe in. They feel they are exhaling into the water because they do a little before inhalation, but that is too little too late.

 

Your exhalation should be twice as long as your inhalation. A longer exhalation leads to a more relaxed exchange of air. Sustain this breathing pattern for a minute or two and your heart rate slows, your blood pressure drops, and your muscles begin to relax. The more you master this basic skill, the more effective your endurance swim will become. This activity can also be practiced on land.

It is important to be mindful of your capacity in this exercise. If you extend your exhalation farther than your capacity allows, your body will go into survival mode and reflexively gasp on the next inhalation. You’ll need to shorten your next breath slightly in order to compensate. One way to prevent yourself from overdoing here is to focus on creating a smooth transition between your in-breath and your out-breath, and back off a bit if you feel any urge to gasp for air.

????

November 19, 2016