Aqua Fun Academy
Throwback Thursday

Swimming Throwback Thursday: Robert’s Class

Swimming Throwback Thursday: Robert’s Class

Throwback Thursday to mat play with Robert’s Class. Pool foam floats are primarily used as a leisure tool for comfort and relaxation, often with a cold beverage. AFA uses foam floats primarily for ice safety training, as they can easily simulate drifting sheets of ice over ponds and lakes. In Canada, this is considered a vital part of swim training. However, that doesn’t stop anyone from using the floats to simulate white-water rafting, a swimmer favorite downtime activity at the end of our classes.

During wintertime, many of us like to skate or approach ice on small rivers or lakes nearby. However, the sturdiness of the ice is an incredibly important factor to whether or not we are able to enjoy this pastime. Nobody wants to be the person to end up falling in the ice. Whether it is proving a point to your friends or taking a (very bad) bet, what could seem like a fun innocent idea at first could end up being an absolutely nightmare within moments. It’s important to learn the rules of ice safety before heading out during the winter season.

The colour of the ice is a very strong indicator as to whether or not it is safe to approach and walk on it.  Clear blue ice is considered the strongest form of ice.
Grey ice however is considered to be the weakest of them all and is not considered safe in anyway.

Mats are a swimmer favourite, as instructors can push them around to simulate white water rafting (without the danger)! Play time, or recess, serves as a necessary break from the rigors of concentrated, academic challenges in the class. But equally important is the fact that safe and well-supervised recess offers cognitive, social, emotional, and physical benefits that may not be fully appreciated when a decision is made to diminish it. Recess is unique from, and a complement to, physical education—not a substitute for it.

🏊🖼

January 26, 2017

Swimming Tip Tuesday

Swimming Tip Tuesday – Diving and lift off

Todays’ Swimming Tip Tuesday, we are going to discuss diving and the importance of using our legs!

When diving it is important to bend at the knees to provide proper lift off.

A common mistake amongst new divers happens when we forget to use our legs correctly, especially during a standing dive. Trying to generate force without bending at the knees creates the opportunity to enter the water chest first instead of hands first. What those of us familiar with diving blunders call a “belly flop”. To avoid this painful lesson, here are some tips about how to position ourselves to enter the water hands first.

From the start push your feet down into the ground preparing to jump, pointing where you want to enter the water with your hands. Remember to keep your hands together, throughout the glide phase of your dive.

  • Place feet side by side

If this is uncomfortable, one may spread their feet no wider than shoulder width apart. This marks our take off point, make sure ones’ toes are as close to the edge of the pool as possible.

  • Bend at the knees till about mid-squat position

This position allows the swimmer to prepare for proper execution of the dive. Furthermore, holding this position we will want to push off with our toes pointed towards our take off point.

  • Bend at the hips bringing the upper body close to the legs.

By lowering the body, we give ourselves a closer point of entrance into the water. We also allow the swimmer to achieve the arch necessary for entering the water hands first.

Remember when moving from the take off point, we want to aim our body out. As to travel forwards, as well as upwards. The image we want to form in our mind is an half moon.

Best of Luck, and Happy Diving!Swimming Tip Tuesday

Swimming Tip Tuesday

Swimming Tip Tuesday: Back Crawl

In Today’s Swimming Tip Tuesday: A breath is taken every time an arm completes a full cycle. Try breathing in as one arm passes your ear and exhale as the other arm passes.

Breathing, something we do every single day of our lives. Breathing in passion, and breathing out results! Breathing, as it is something we do involuntarily should be easy enough to do in the water! Integrating our movements to sync up with our breathing requires a little more thought than expected. Though while swimming on our back a swimmer has the added advantage that their face is out of the water for the duration of the stroke. So, when do we breathe? In any exercise, we want to exhale on the effort and inhale during the recovery phase.

In back crawl the effort is when the arm is re-entering the water, during the push phase. While the recovery phase is when the water enters the air, or exits the water, both of these elements are what compose a complete cycle of back crawl arms. Understanding the basic mechanics of the stroke it should be easy to break down when to breathe.

However, when back crawl is done both arms move juxtaposed. Meaning one arm is always in the opposite phase to the other. To get around this conundrum, the swimmer can focus on one arms cycle and co-ordinate their breathing in time with that arm. Our dominant arm can vary from sport to sport, so an easy way to find out which of the two is a swimmers’ dominant arm, is to take note of which arm the swimmer start their stroke with. When the swimmers dominant arm is out of the water they must remember to inhale, similarly when the swimmers dominant arm is in the water, they must remember to exhale.Swimming Tip Tuesday

Throwback Thursday

Swimming Throwback Thursday: Play Area Clean Up

Throwback Thursday to play area cleaning with Sam, Hannah, Onieka and our adorable little swimmers Andrew and Leah. At a depth shallower than most bath tubs, our Sunny View play area is a secure zone where swimmers can play and wait before the start of their classes, or even after the end of their classes. For some of our swimmers, the play area represents a comfortable way to ease into the water before starting class, which allows our swimmers to start class in a relaxed, refreshed manner.

Not every child wants to jump right in. Some want to wade in or gradually “sink” in—carefully sitting on each step of the shallow end’s entry point. And that’s ok. The play area is an easy way to allow a child to gradually enter the pool. The play area creates a simple transition. Transition is the period of time between activities, like when some students are waiting for others to finish or students are waiting to take turns doing activities. It is very easy for transition times to get out of hand, especially for preschool age children. There are many tricks that teachers use to make things go smoothly between preschool activities, including the play area.

Parents with infants too young to join our program also frequently splash and wade in the play area. The only requirement is a waterproof baby diaper. If you want to take your baby to a swimming pool then a swim diaper is a must. Even at the beach, a swim diaper prevents your baby from leaving an unpleasant reminder in the sand or salt water. Having the right swim diaper for your baby can make swimming with your baby much more relaxing for you.

Our play area is so entertaining that Andrew and Leah would rather clean up than go home.

🏊🙊🙉🙈

February 21, 2017

throwback-thursday

Swimming Throwback Thursday: November 22, 2016

Throwback Thursday to pool rafting with Menashe, Robert, Marcus and Sabrina. Pool foam floats are primarily used as a leisure tool for comfort and relaxation, often with a cold beverage. AFA uses foam floats primarily for ice safety training, as they can easily simulate drifting sheets of ice over ponds and lakes. In Canada, this is considered a vital part of swim training. However, that doesn’t stop anyone from using the floats to simulate white-water rafting, a swimmer favorite downtime activity at the end of our classes.

Mats are a swimmer favourite, as instructors can push them around to simulate white water rafting (without the danger)! Play time, or recess, serves as a necessary break from the rigors of concentrated, academic challenges in the class. But equally important is the fact that safe and well-supervised recess offers cognitive, social, emotional, and physical benefits that may not be fully appreciated when a decision is made to diminish it. Recess is unique from, and a complement to, physical education—not a substitute for it.

Is that Instructor Evan teaching in the background? Yeah, we think there’s some teaching happening too! 🤣

🏊🙊🙉🙈

November 22, 2016

throwback-thursday

Swimming Throwback Thursday: December 2, 2016

Throwback Thursday to a full house at our Sunny View location.

In the top left: instructor Menashe consults a curriculum sheet while his swimmer takes a much needed break. An effective curriculum provides teachers, students, administrators and community stakeholders with a measurable plan and structure for delivering a quality education. The curriculum identifies the learning outcomes, standards and core competencies that students must demonstrate before advancing to the next level. Teachers play a key role in developing, implementing, assessing and modifying the curriculum. An evidenced-based curriculum acts as a road map for teachers and students to follow on the path to academic success.

In top centre: instructor Alex wrapping up a productive class with some play time. Mats are a swimmer favourite, as instructors can push them around to simulate white water rafting (without the danger)! Play time, or recess, serves as a necessary break from the rigors of concentrated, academic challenges in the class. But equally important is the fact that safe and well-supervised recess offers cognitive, social, emotional, and physical benefits that may not be fully appreciated when a decision is made to diminish it. Recess is unique from, and a complement to, physical education—not a substitute for it.

On top right: instructor Robert runs his swimmer through a kicking drill, a common tool used for improving both leg strength and leg technique. Drills need to be performed slower than usual swimming speed, this enables you to get a better ‘feel’ for the stroke, the motions; position of the hands, head, hips, feet. Once the ‘feel’ for each drill has been recognised and near perfected, you can then focus on increasing the speed at which they’re performed, so that when the full stroke is initiated you gain a sense of better efficiency.

On bottom: instructor Maria runs a swimmer through a back drill. This drill, often performed with a flutter board, works on improving both leg technique and strength, as well as improving back balance by helping the swimmer understand and adjust his or her center of gravity in the water.

A full house means we get to share a beautiful cross-section of the different stages of swimming lessons with you!

🏊🙊🙉🙈

December 2, 2016

throwback-thursday

Swimming Throwback Thursday: November 10, 2016

Throwback Thursday / Flashback Friday to last week, where we caught instructor Robert setting a fashion-forward swimming trend. Why settle for one layer of eye protection when you can have two!

Dated: November 10, 2016

november-10-2016

Swimming Friday Funday

Swimming Friday Funday

#FridayFunday is: Going for a private lap swim in our pool. Thanks to our ASAC swimmer Cole.

Have a great weekend everyone!

🐳🏊🏆😏

April 12, 2016

WanderlustWednesday

Swimming Wanderlust Wednesday: Casa Chameleon

Today’s Swimming Wanderlust Wednesday: Casa Chameleon

Our first Wanderlust Wednesday foray into Central America takes us to Costa Rica, where Casa Chameleon’s private plunge pools offer captivating views of the Costa Rican jungle juxtaposed with the Pacific Ocean. The private pool might not be suitable for laps, but we’d say the view is worth it. It’s the ultimate private romantic getaway.

✈🌎🌄🏖🏊🇨🇷

Casa Chameleon

TipTuesday

Swimming Tip Tuesday: Butterfly

Our Swimming Tip Tuesday of the week:

Your body should be led by the crown of your head with your shoulders and hips horizontal. Applies to Butterfly.

Want to learn more? Sign up on our website for personalized training with one of our instructors.

🚣🏄🏊

Your body should be led by the  crown of your head